METTI

Metti or the toe ring is worn by women in India as an indicator / symbol of their married status. It is referred to in Hindi as ‘bichiya’ , ‘jodav’ in Marathi, ‘mettelu’ in Telugu & ‘kaalungura’ in Kannada.

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It is believed that wearing Metti on the second toe exerts pressure on certain nerves in the body that relate to good health and the reproductive system, thus enhancing chances of pro creation. In India we firmly believe in the importance of nerve endings in our toes and it is referred to as ‘prana’ or life force. In other words it also refers to the concept of acupressure points in the toes.

 

Generally toe rings are made of Silver only since Gold is considered to be ‘ pure’ and hence forbidden from being worn below the waist.

 

Silver is also said to be a good conductor that is capable of absorbing energy from Mother Earth and passing along the energy to rejuvenate the entire system.

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In ancient times it was men who wore mettis as a symbol of their marital status  but the practice was discontinued by them for varied reasons. In fact even today in some weddings you will find the groom wearing the metti during the wedding ceremony. In fact there are episodes in ancient Hindu tenets to support this theory.

 

It is believed that Lord Vishnu with his consort Thayaar decided to teach a lesson to Thirumangai Alzhar who was waylaying and looting newly married couples of their ornaments in the Thirunagari area. He appeared with Thaayaar [ bedecked in gold ornaments] as a couple and was waylaid and looted. Azhwar was unable to remove Lord Vishnu’s metti and is said to have bit it with his strong teeth and removed it. But as the Lord willed otherwise Azhwar was unable to life the booty and so goes the story of what followed.

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Even today there are historic & religious references to these episodes in temples in those areas.

 

It is clearly obvious from this that any practice proposed in the Hindu Dharma is based on science and it is not a religion made of rituals and superstitions but one on strong scientific theories on how to live life.

As event planners a common problem we see faced by many a bride is at the moment when the metti is to placed on the toe. Invariably there is an element of discomfort and delay when the metti is placed on the toe and it refuses to go in smoothly.

As wedding planners we always carry a small bottle of vaseline with us. When the toe is covered with vaseline there is lubrication and this helps in slipping on the toe ring smoothly without hurting the skin or causing delay in rituals.

NALANGU

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Event Management, fun as it may seem from the outside involves  a lot of preparation in terms of understanding the various traditions of the different religions and communities spread across India. Event planning as the term denotes is simply making available all the things required for the conduct of a function well before time and in the required manner.

The term ‘Nalangu’ is used in different connotations during weddings across various communities in the South of India. As wedding event managers it is important for us to have a good understanding of the various rituals and traditions followed by each community to be able to make the necessary arrangements.

In some communities the term  ‘Nalangu’ refers to the ceremony that is held on the evening prior to the actual wedding. Here the bride is bedecked and seated and all the Sumangalis in the family apply sandal paste to her face, hands and legs. Kumkum is then applied on the forehead. Rose water and flowers are then sprinkled over her head as a form of blessing. Aarathi is then performed to end the ritual.

This is considered by some as a cleansing as well as a beautification ceremony of the bride. Whatever be the actual significance the presence of aromatic elements like sandal paste, flowers , rose water etc lends a harmonious and auspicious note as a precursor to the wedding.

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In Tamil Brahmin weddings ‘Nalangu’ refers to the fun filled game session that comes immediately after the wedding is over. It is looked forward to as an opportunity for both families to interact in a relaxed manner sharing a sense of bonhomie and camaraderie after the hectic wedding preparations. A lot of music and cheer fills the air with both parties taking sides in supporting the bride and groom in the course of the small games that are conducted.

A few decades ago this ritual was mostly skipped as most felt it was unnecessary and not suitable to current day scenario. But in recent times the young couples evince great interest in the conduct of this wedding ritual. As event managers we are often asked to bring in innovative games to make it a participative ritual.

The bride and groom are seated opposite each other on a mat on the floor and the session starts with a small ‘make – up’ session where the couple have to apply sandal paste, kumkum, powder and other beautifying elements on each other. This is followed by rolling of the coconut across the floor to each other which is followed by a tug – of – war contest to see who is stronger of the two in retrieving the coconut, exchange of rice & dal, and breaking of the appalams to the accompaniment of loud cheers and shouts.

In some sects this tradition is  a part of the wedding function and is therefore not taken out as a separate event.

These games were of significance in olden days where at times the bride and groom were not given an opportunity to meet each other before the wedding.  Such games helped them tide over their inhibitions and facilitated physical proximity. It is also said that when child marriages were the order of the day in yester years such games were conducted to entertain the child bride & groom. Now it is more of a fun filled entertainment session.